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Posted by Morphisec Team on January 15, 2018

The Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities disclosed earlier this month generated a lot of noise and a lot of confusion. Our security experts received a deluge of questions from customers and industry personnel alike. Responding to this need, Morphisec CTO and VP R&D Michael Gorelik went on air to provide some answers. If you missed the webinar, you can watch it here.

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Posted by Michael Gorelik on January 5, 2018

The IT world is still shaking from the news that most modern processors have severe architecture flaws. This makes it possible for attackers to gain access to user mode and kernel memory data to leak crypto-keys, passwords, memory structures like loaded module addresses and other valuable information. The security flaws potentially affect all major CPUs, including chips manufactured by Intel, AMD and ARM.

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Watch our security alert webinar on-demand in which Morphisec CTO Michael Gorelik, cuts through the noise surrounding the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities and answers live questions. 

WATCH IT NOW!

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Posted by Roy Moshailov on January 2, 2018

RokRAT is a sophisticated Remote Access Trojan (RAT) that is skilled at evading detection and uses multiple techniques to make analysis difficult. The current RokRAT campaign was identified by Cisco Talos in November. The earliest known RokRAT campaign occured in April, although this used a less evasive malware variant. 

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Posted by Morphisec Team on January 20, 2017

Cybersecurity had a turbulent 2016, to say the least. We saw the rise of ransomware, the emergence of IoT botnets, landmark security legislation and Yahoo’s disclosure about its 1-billion-record-hack, the largest in history.

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Posted by Ursula Ron on December 7, 2016

The FireFox zero-day recently used in the wild made headlines when TOR users that fell victim to the attack lost the one thing they were looking for: anonymous browsing. Speculation ran rife that the exploit may have been created by the FBI or another governmental agency, especially as the attack resembled past investigations used to identify Tor users.

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Posted by Mordechai Guri, Ph.D. on September 23, 2016

Ransomware has grabbed mainstream media attention recently but it’s nothing new – in fact, its origins can be traced back to floppy disk times. Part of ransomware’s new found notoriety is certainly due to the criminals’ latest target of choice, the healthcare industry, which is considered sacrosanct to most. And ransomware’s very nature lends itself to news-worthy headlines. Unlike other types of malware which rely on stealth to infiltrate systems or quietly siphon off data, ransomware boldly declares its presence and intent, often with a clever name to go with it.

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Posted by Arthur Braunstein on August 17, 2016

 

This year’s Black Hat USA conference was bigger and badder than ever, with attendance up nearly 30% according to show organizers. Of all the security conferences, Black Hat has the most clear divide between the technical practitioner side and the security vendors, and the main themes varied depending on which side of the divide you were standing.  From the practitioner side, these ranged from enhancing technical skills (excellent training) to strategies and threats, to leadership and alignment with the business. The instructors and presenters were world class, the content was superb, and thoughtfulness and creativity were everywhere.

All good for the practitioners and kudos to the organizers. On the vendor side, things were a little more nuanced.

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Posted by Michael Gorelik on July 12, 2016

There are kits for everything these days: beer brewing, engine tuning, and, yes, hacking. Hacking's “exploit kits” (EKs)—toolkits with packaged exploit codes—let almost anyone become a digital intruder, from the guy down the hall to the nation-state operator oceans away. I'm going to share some key areas you need to be aware of when preparing for an EK-driven attack.

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Posted by Michael Gorelik on July 2, 2016

The disappearance of Angler has left a gaping hole in the malware market which cybercriminals are only to happy to fill with new variants of old standbys. The latest to reemerge after a period of disuse are Locky and Dridex. A new Locky campaign spotted in the wild on June 20 is analyzed by Pierluigi Paganini on the Security Affairs site. Now a bigger and badder Dridex has reappeared, with more sophisticated evasion tactics, including a new sandbox evasion technique.

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Posted by Arthur Braunstein on June 14, 2016

 

Imagine a conversation like this.

ASPIRING VIOLINIST:  Maestro, what should I do to be a violin virtuoso?

MAESTRO: You must practice 48 hours every day on the tuba. I will sell you a tuba.

ASPIRING VIOLINIST:  But there are only 24 hours in a day. Did you say tuba?

MAESTRO: If you won’t follow my advice, I can’t help you.

More Madness than Method

It sounds absurd, but conversations like this unfold daily when enterprise cyber practitioners meet with industry vendors and security consultants. The industry tells them that they are not doing enough. They must install more security technology, hire more analysts, and patch more frequently. This may seem simple; merely a matter of budget and execution. But the technology is not up to the task and the cost of following this advice to the letter would force enterprises to spend themselves out of existence. And it still wouldn’t work. Not enough hours, wrong instrument.

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