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Posted by Michael Gorelik on June 10, 2019

During the period of March to May 2019, Morphisec Labs observed a new, highly sophisticated variant of the ShellTea / PunchBuggy backdoor malware that attempted to infiltrate a number of machines within the network of a customer in the hotel-entertainment industry. It is believed that the malware was deployed as a result of several phishing attempts.

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Posted by Alon Groisman on March 1, 2019

Over the past two weeks, Morphisec Labs has identified an increase in AVE_MARIA malware infecting victims through a variety of phishing methods. One of the downloader components and C2 metadata are similar to those we saw in the Orcus RAT attacks last month and we believe they are by the same threat actor.

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Posted by Morphisec Labs on December 5, 2018

Today Adobe disclosed a new Flash zero-day, releasing a patch for the critical vulnerability in an out-of-band update. Successful exploitation gives attackers the ability to execute arbitrary code on the targeted machine, and eventually assume full system control. Morphisec customers are already protected from attacks exploiting this vulnerability.

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Posted by Michael Gorelik on November 29, 2018

Note: This post was updated 11-30-18 with details of a new intercepted attack. See technical description below.

Over the past three days, Morphisec Labs researchers have discovered a widespread cyber campaign hitting multiple targets. Morphisec researchers dubbed the campaign “Pied Piper”as it delivers various Remote Access Trojan (RAT) payloads via phishing, across multiple countries.

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Posted by Michael Gorelik on November 21, 2018

This blog was co-authored by Alon Groisman.

It seems like the rumors of FIN7’s decline have been hasty. Just a few months after the well-publicized indictment of three high-ranking members in August, Morphisec has identified a new FIN7 campaign that appears to be targeting the restaurant industry.

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Posted by Michael Gorelik on October 8, 2018

 

Over the past year, Morphisec and several other endpoint protection companies have been tracking a resurgence in activity from the Cobalt Group. Cobalt is one of the most notorious cybercrime operations, with attacks against more than 100 banks across 40 countries

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Posted by Shelley Leveson on September 28, 2018

The Fallout exploit kit, named for its similarities to the once notorious Nuclear exploit kit, already shows signs of reaching the levels of popularity of its namesake. Since its discovery by security researchers at the end of August, Fallout has been seen distributing the SmokeLoader trojan, GandCrab ransomware, CoalaBot, various potentially unwanted programs (PUPs) and, most recently, a new ransomware strain called SAVEfiles.

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Posted by Roy Moshailov on August 12, 2018

Fileless malware is a type of a malicious code execution technique that operates completely within process memory; no files are dropped onto the disk. Without any artifacts on the hard drive to detect, these attacks easily evade most security solutions.

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Posted by Roy Moshailov on July 18, 2018

July has been a busy month for the distributors of GandCrab ransomware. After about two months with no major update, the cybercrime gang behind GandCrab released version 4, and a few days later, version 4.1. The primary delivery method is via compromised WordPress websites, which have been hijacked to include fake crack application pages, which in turn redirect to the GandCrab executable. Other distribution methods are Exploit Kits (EK) and malicious email campaigns.

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Posted by Roy Moshailov on June 27, 2018

A new highly sophisticated botnet incorporating numerous malicious, evasive techniques is quickly spreading its tentacles. Dubbed MyloBot, the botnet uses an usually complex chain attack and combines multiple anti-analysis techniques to make it more difficult to detect the payload and harder to analyze by security researchers. Initial research published by Deep Instinct points out that everything on the victim’s end takes place in memory, while the main business logic of the botnet is executed in an external process using code injection. This makes it even harder to detect and trace.

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